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Michele Ferrucci
27th March 2012, 16:22
Hello mates,

I don't know if I will be able to migrate to Australia (I think I will wait for the implementation of SkillSelect service...),
but I know exactly what I have to do during this waiting time...
I MUST IMPROVE MY ENGLISH and, possibly, get the IELTS certificate.

For this reason, I planned a road-map for the preparation of the exam,
that I'm going to get on July. (I hope...)

Unfortunately I work about 65 km far from my home, so I must spend about two hours each day driving my car. :dull:
I decide to use this "waste time" listening British Council Elementary Podcasts (http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/elementary-podcasts) (suggested by manuelwild - thanks again!),
in order to improve my LISTENING skill.

Then I have bought an interesting book, Instant English (http://www.instantenglish.it/) by John Peter Sloan, which is a very funny actor & teacher.
This book is very "ligth" and it is helping me to fix some basic concepts of the language and to improve my READING skill.

I think it could be a good idea if I use this thread like a "notebook" during my preparation:
I will write down some remakable (for me) topics about the grammar and the dictionary, following - if I can - the exercises
suggested in the podcasts and in the book. Everything in English, of course!
I would like to share my concepts with you and, at the same time, to train my WRITING.
For this reason, if you see something wrong, don't hesitate to tell me where the mistake is!
(obviously, if Valerio - or the others mods - think this thread is not appropriate... delete it!)

Finally, I hope to improve my English during the next four-six weeks...
on June I'm going to "skype-call" a frind of mine which is now in Japan, but he settled in England (Manchester, I think) about five years:
he is a very good English-speaker, of course, and I hope he could help me to improve my worst skill: SPEAKING.

See ya!
(I think this is the aussie-way to say "bye bye", isn't it?) :D

Michele Ferrucci
27th March 2012, 16:33
FIRST CONCEPT: "BEAUTY".

My wife is beautiful.
Life is beautiful.
Sunny wheather is beautiful.

A thing can be beautiful.
A woman can be beautiful.
A MAN (boy, guy, boyfriend, and so on...) CANNOT BE BEAUTIFUL!!! A man can be HANDSOME!

so
My wife is beautiful.
My daughter is beautiful.
My life is beautiful.
BUT
I am HANDSOME. (and the pigs fly... :emoticon-0136-giggl)


That's quite "strange" for me... Can anyone explain why?

Michele Ferrucci
27th March 2012, 17:42
PHRASAL VERBS (my nigthmare...) : LOOK

to look at something
regular... it means "to see, to watch, ..." something!
Look at me!
Look at the signal: you can't go ahead!

to look for something
it means "to try to find" something...
Dont' worry, dear: I'm looking for your lost luggage!
Now I'm looking for a new job in Australia.

to look after something
it means "to take care of" something.
Look after your ticket! Don't lose it!
I must look after my son: he is just one year old!

to look forward to something (that's nice!)
it means "to be excited" about something will happen in the future! (I think...)
I'm looking forward to migrate to Australia!
My parents are looking forward to meet you!

iGanz
28th March 2012, 14:12
good on you!
knowing phrasal verbs is a very useful way to improve english fast.

however, remember that phrasal verbs are usually used informally in every day speech. so, for example, do not use them if you're having an interview!

Michele Ferrucci
28th March 2012, 16:21
Thank you iGanz!

an other TIP: SORRY vs EXCUSE ME

"Sorry" is usually used when you want to apologize to someone about a "mistake" you didn't want to make... or about something you cannot control...
EEEEEEEECCIU'! I'm sorry!
Sorry, I am late!

"Excuse me" is used when you WANT to bother someone, for example when you politely ask for an information...
Excuse me, could you tell me where is the Los Lugguage Office, please? (that's extremely polite!)
Excuse me, what time is it?


Obviously, Being very polite sometimes can sound ridicolous... it depends on the situation!

Michele Ferrucci
28th March 2012, 17:11
BRITISH HUMOR

Sherlock Holmes and Mr. Watson go to the camping in the countryside.
They are lying on the ground, watching the night sky, and Sherlock Holmes says:
"Now Mr. Watson look at these stars and tell me: Which is THE RIGHT QUESTION we have to ask?"
and Mr. Watson answers: "Well... the right question...
there are millions of stars in the Universe... nobody can say exactly how many they are.
Each star has probably a lot of planets, so maybe there are several planets which are similar to the Earth!
I think the right question is: is there in the whole universe any kind of life?"
"Mr. Watson!! You are officially an IDOT!!! The right question is:
WHERE - IS - OUR - TENT ?!?!?"

:D

salvoemme
28th March 2012, 19:58
Hi Michele, you had a good idea!!

Lose / miss / waste

Lose key

Miss the train
Miss the bus

waste of time
that was a complete waste of an afternoon

Tanks a lot!!

Michele Ferrucci
29th March 2012, 12:39
FAST TIP: TOO vs AS WELL

Here is a tip I've never seen before...
"too" and "as well" have the same meaning, but...

"I'm going to the John's party tonight, and you?"

you can answer:
Me too!
or
I'm going too!
or
I'm going as well!

BUT
you CANNOT answer:
Me AS WELL!

manuelwild
30th March 2012, 01:42
I have bought an interesting book
I bought
bisogna non tradurre dall'italiano.. "ho comprato un libro interessante".. il fatto di averlo comprato un'azione finita, quindi si usa il past simple ^^




Tanks a lot!!

Salvo, indovina che consonante manca nella prima parola? :)

Michele Ferrucci
30th March 2012, 11:58
I bought
bisogna non tradurre dall'italiano.. "ho comprato un libro interessante".. il fatto di averlo comprato un'azione finita, quindi si usa il past simple ^^


Yes, that's true! Thank you.
I know my worst mistake is "thinking" in italian and then translating in English...
I should just think in English! But it's still too difficult...
Now I'm training my brain: when I do something, I try to think (or say) what I do in English.
So... I'm going to have a coffee break with my colleagues
or
Now I have to work because my boss is too nervous today!

But before I go, I want just to tell you an other

BRITISH JOKE

Two couple of married friends are having a lunch together...
Suddenly, one husband says: "We went to a fantastic restaurant last saturday, and we had a very good dinner! The best Indian food I've never eaten..."
and the other husband: "Really? That's amazing. We love Indian food! What's the name of the restaurant? Where is it?"
"Ouch... my memory is so awful... I can't remember... you know... What's the name of that flower... the red flower that smells good... People buy it on Valentine's day..."
"Do you mean the rose?"
"Rose! Yeah, that's it!"
Then he turns to his wife and says:
"Rose! What's the name of the indian restaurant we went on saturday????"

:D

iGanz
30th March 2012, 12:19
PAST SIMPLE VS PRESENT PERFECT

As Manuel said you should use SIMPLE PAST when you're talking about a past action which is completed and there is usually an indication of time (last year, one week ago etc.)

Es. I couldn't go to the cinema last Sunday because I was sick => it means that now I feel good

You can use PRESENT PERFECT when you're talking about an action started in the past but still continuing in the present (I mean in the moment you're talking)

Es. I can't come to work this morning. I have been sick through the night => it means that I'm still sick

iGanz
30th March 2012, 12:37
I'M GOING TO HAVE VS. I'M HAVING

As for "I'm going to have a coffee break with my colleagues" note that:

We usually use I'M GOING TO HAVE when we have already planned this action (for example, if in the morning a friend asks me "Any plans for this afternoon?" I can answer "I'm going to have a coffe with my colleagues").

We usually use I'M HAVING when the action is imminent (for example, I'm going out from the office and my colleague asks me "Are you leaving?"I can answer "No, I'm having a coffee")


Note that you can also use the "WILL" FUTURE when you take an immediate decision.
Es. At the restaurant the waiter asks you: "What would you like to drink?". You can answer "I'll have a glass of red wine".

iGanz
30th March 2012, 12:50
The best Indian food I've never eaten...

in this case you have tou use EVER. "The best Indian food I've ever eaten". (because never is a negative adverb)
In England, or in Australia or USA as well, they can just use (especially in informal conversations) EVER without the verb.

Es. The best Indian food ever.


When do we use NEVER?

Es. "iGanz, have you EVER been in South America?" "No, unfortunately I've NEVER been there

arianuova
1st April 2012, 15:09
This is a very good idea!!! I will follow this thread, so I think I will improve my english skills :emoticon-0142-happy

Michele Ferrucci
2nd April 2012, 17:47
ONE/ONES

Here is a pronoun that is quite unknown by Italian people...
Indeed, in Italy we can use adjectives as pronouns without adding any word of reference:
we say
"Quali scarpe ti piacciono di pi? Le rosse o le nere?" "le nere!"
In English this is forbidden! We cannot use any "stand alone" adjectives, so we must use the pronouns one/ones:
"Which shoes do you prefer? The red ONES or the black ONES?" "I like the black ONES!"
'ones' refers to 'shoes' and it must always be said.

manuelwild
3rd April 2012, 00:50
OT: Oh damn.. I'm really sorry guys, I wrote in Italian :Tapiro: Why anyone didn't notice me? ;) END OT

Michele Ferrucci
3rd April 2012, 11:42
OT: Oh damn.. I'm really sorry guys, I wrote in Italian :Tapiro: Why anyone didn't notice me? ;) END OT

You should moderate... yourself! :D

TRICKY TIP: SAY/SAID vs TELL/TOLD

"to say" ad "to tell" are quite the same in meaning... but there are at least two differences in the use:

1-
If we give someone an information, or if we ask for an information, must use TELL/TOLD:
"Could you tell me where we are?"
"Tell me what I have to do!"
on the other hand, if we use the direct speech we should use always "say":
"Today is Jane's birthday! Say happy birthday to her!"
"Now we have to leave... say goodbye to your grandmother"
and... in a combination:
Sherlock Holmes says: "Mr. Watson, tell me what the right question is"

tell a story, tell the truth, tell a lie, tell the difference between...
say hello, say goodbye, as I said before...

2-
"tell" wants the so-called DOUBLE OBJECT to refer to someone, while "say" wants the preposition "to".

Tell ME the truth!
Sherlock Holmes said TO Mr.Watson!
My grandmother told ME wonderful stories...
Now we must say goodbye TO you!

Michele Ferrucci
3rd April 2012, 11:55
BRITISH JOKE

A dog comes in a pub and says: "Can I have a pint of beer?"
The barman, a bit shocked, answers: "Of course! Here it is!"
This happens again and again in the next weeks, so that the barman and the dog become friends.
One day the barman says to the dog:
"You know, dear... You are a very interesting dog! Now there is a circus in the town...
Why don't you ask for a job there? I bet they would be very impressed by your skills!!!"
The dog thinks a little and answers:
"Of course! But are you sure they need a COMPUTER PROGRAMMER?!?!?"

:D

I know, I know... it's terrible!
But I love this kind of joke!

Alibdo
24th April 2012, 23:29
Sorry, but i don't understand the last joke

'dog' is a particular way to call a computer programmer, isn't it?

It is the only logical sense that i can find in


Forgive me if i make some mistakes and please help me to do better (this is the purpose of this thread :))

enjoythemusic1927
21st March 2013, 01:36
Not exactly mate, i guess that the barman talked about the circus because it was something exceptional the dog speaking, but surely the dog computer programmer it's so much more, more than what the barmen believed. I hope now you understood it, best regards.

cliffy
16th October 2013, 12:21
Hi,Enjoy..I see now this post very nice.

In my opinion,maybe the dog was thought that bartender knew about his profession as a programmer..:D

(p.s.I hope my english is exact:Tapiro::))

enjoythemusic1927
16th October 2013, 16:19
Hey Cliffy, nice to see you again. Yes, i'm everywhere.

cliffy
16th October 2013, 17:13
Hey Cliffy, nice to see you again. Yes, i'm everywhere.

Yes,it's true :D...and that's good,Enjoy:)...this thread is very important to know english language...:hi:see you soon..

enjoythemusic1927
17th October 2013, 01:02
Yeah, it's a good chance to improve the language. See you :)

cliffy
22nd October 2013, 14:04
Excuse me ,Enjoy...may I ask you a question more ?...:speec..In case of receiving a telephone call,which is the right answer for "mi dispiace,ha sbagliato numero..".?..Is it right "Sorry,wrong number..."or isn't it?:sweat

Federica Gallerani
22nd October 2013, 17:24
"Sorry,wrong number..."
is perfect :emoticon-0137-clapp

cliffy
22nd October 2013, 17:53
is perfect :emoticon-0137-clapp

Thanks,mate!!! :)You are a gentlewoman:77:..nice to meet you :hi:

enjoythemusic1927
22nd October 2013, 23:54
Excuse me ,Enjoy...may I ask you a question more ?

No, you cant', i'm sorry :tongu

cliffy
23rd October 2013, 10:12
No, you cant', i'm sorry :tongu

:surprise:...Really??...:(.....Why not???...:lipss...Oh.than sorry,Enjoy...anyway...I 'll ask you no more...

Petrus
23rd October 2013, 12:02
Cliffy, he's just kiddin' :)
While reading this topic, I thought that opening a thread about the Aussie slang could be useful and funny, don't you agree?

cliffy
23rd October 2013, 12:37
Cliffy, he's just kiddin' :)
While reading this topic, I thought that opening a thread about the Aussie slang could be useful and funny, don't you agree?


Uff..:worri..may be You,re right,Petrus...(sorry,Enjoy)...I think I'm really stupid,sometimes.. is it true??....:65:...:sweat...:sweat...Another:Tapiro: ???...ok...:Tapiro::emoticon-0179-headb...Anyway..thanks,Petrus...you are a gentleman:emoticon-0155-flowe

Stefano16
11th December 2013, 18:08
Which are the best books for IELTS preparation?
I need it to improve my English, both for job and (in the future) for Australia ;)

cliffy
7th January 2014, 17:26
Hello, mates. Excuse me, I have just a little question and I' ll hope someone will kindly answer to me.
Cause I have to get some words of thanks by a tweet, I ask you : which is the right way for "grazie mille"?
I know it's better and much more easy saying "Thank U very much" but..... is "a thousand of thanks" right, too?:)

Petrus
7th January 2014, 21:57
No, absolutely. An English native speaker will never understand what you mean with "a thousand of thanks". Definitely tank you very much is the closest translation possible of "grazie mille" :wink1:

cliffy
7th January 2014, 22:32
No, absolutely. An English native speaker will never understand what you mean with "a thousand of thanks". Definitely tank you very much is the closest translation possible of "grazie mille" :wink1:

Ohhhh..I've already posted my message by twitter; anyway I know something more about english language, now. Thanks, mate..:surprise: indeed..Thank U very much!:)

Petrus
8th January 2014, 00:13
You're welcome :)

Maverinick
8th January 2014, 02:50
"Thanks a lot" is my favourite :)

cliffy
9th January 2014, 14:43
You're welcome :)
:DYes...You're right,mate...There is a welcome by " due parole su di voi" , ( written in Italian language) , and there is better here, too!!
:D

Petrus
9th January 2014, 15:24
Maybe you've misunderstood my answer, Cliffy: my "you're welcome" was just the answer to your "thank U very much". It's the same than "prego" or "figurati" in Italian.

cliffy
9th January 2014, 21:18
Maybe you've misunderstood my answer, Cliffy: my "you're welcome" was just the answer to your "thank U very much". It's the same than "prego" or "figurati" in Italian.

:)Ops...Sorry...anyway,I know that the way is "not at all"..:(
:worri may be that's a way that people don't use very often.